Greetings!

I'm a Ruby on Rails developer finishing up a six-month intensive web development program in Denver called gSchool, run by Jeff Casimir and Jumpstart Lab. I am eager to match my talents with a company in Boston.

In particular, I'm looking for a team that invests in the growth of its employees and contributes to open source. As a junior developer, it's also important to me that I find a collaborative environment that encourages pair-programming, and follows test-driven and iterative product development.

Becoming a Developer Oct 15

Last Friday I gave a lightning talk about ‘Becoming a Developer.’ The talk was given at the brightcove offices prior to the ‘Wicked Good Ruby Conf.’ Here is what I had to say:

The majority of my formal training in becoming a developer took place at gSchool. gSchool is run out of and incubator in Denver called galvanize and is taught by Jumpstart Lab. Outside of a computer science degree, gSchool is the longest developer training program in the United States, running full-time for 6 months. At a typical 70 hours a week, that amounts to about 1680 hours of project work and training. And...

title Jun 14

Getting back into a group after the individual project feels good. I have been almost exclusively pair-programming this week and we have covered more ground than I did in the first week working on my own, and I feel good about our code, as we have been following TDD. As for Service Oriented Architecture, I feel like I am understanding the overarching concepts so far, but that the implementation details are a bit fuzzy. Additionally, I feel like our constructing a SOA is a bit contrived in this setting. That is, we would probably not be doing SOA on a project this small and ‘simple’. We...

Individual Project Retrospecive Jun 7

Reflecting on my personal project, I did not build features super quickly, and I collaborated with others more often than I expected too. It was nice to be on my own schedule, but it was challenging to solve some of the problems on my own, and found myself getting stuck on little things more often than I have when working in groups and pairing on things. This makes me feel that I would fit well in a professional situation that allowed me both to pair and to work independently.

Throughout the process I was a bit self-conscious that my product was not complex enough. However, I also love what...

Flyin Solo May 31

We are currently in the middle of our first individual project and it has been a good experience thus far. While in the real world it is not very realistic to think that I will be working completely, even this ‘solo’ project has been a collaborative effort with my fellow classmates, working more independently has been a good test of my programming knowledge and skills. Seeing my strengths as well as the gaps in my understanding will help me grow and be able to contribute in more meaningfully to our final group project and to projects in the professional world beyond gSchool.

ArtWalk Boston May 24

Life moves fast in Boston and in many other cities around the world, so much so that we often forget to lift up our heads to discover the beautiful things about the place and the culture in which we live. One thing that graces Boston (my home to be, come August 2013) and many other cities is art that lives on walls and in parks and in other public spaces. While many of these pieces of art go unnoticed or unappreciated because of the fast pace at which many people move or because of the distractions, often digital, that seem to drive our daily behavior, they stealthily give places a unique...

The Handshake May 17

FeedEngine has been a tough project so far. There are a number of new things that we have to learn to make this project successful, namely, how to handshake with other applications via APIs. We are building an application that facilitates group running by allowing users to organize group runs with their twitter followers. It then integrates with RunKeeper to allow users to view statistics of those individuals in the group who use RunKeeper. We have successfully linked up with Twitter and RunKeeper, and now probably the biggest challenges that we have taken on is making our app into a single...

Don't Fear the Unknown May 10

Just started a new project! We are building an application that helps runners and friends unite. Through our site they can organize group runs and subsequently view data about the individuals on those runs by using and connecting their Fitbit, Nike+, RunTracker, DailyMile, MapMyFitness (to name a few we are thinking of) to our site. So, we will be integrating with those APIs to make that work. It feels like this is a legit product that people would want to use. I like the fact that we are focusing on running rather than trying to make it a broader, less focused, health and fitness app....

May 3

Our work process for the DoSE Project project was different/better in some ways than that of the SoSE project. Namely, we started by fixing broken test of SoSE and then proceeded to test drive the new features. Fixing the old test gave me a much better understanding of the code I was working with an test driving the new features made them work a lot better than had we not Test Drove. Another thing we did differently this time around was to After being in so deep with this code base for the last six weeks, I am ready to start the next project. I think learning how to work with legacy code...

The Turn Around Apr 26

This week had been good practice in focusing on quality of features rather than quantity. It seems as though last project many groups cut one corner or another to push more features rather than delivering fewer features of higher quality. In my last group we decided not to focus on testing as much as we should have. This time around my group has learned the lesson of what it means to inherit that untested code. That is, the product was fragile and we had to spend the last couple of days fixing and writing new tests. the upside of fixing these tests is that it helped us understand the code...

Halfway Apr 19

This last project was a great learning experience. We experienced some of the struggles of working with legacy code, including (in my group) not having constant access to the person that wrote the original code, because he was in San Francisco. I also learned that not testing makes me uncomfortable and reduces my ability to understand the code that I am working with, therefore reducing my ability to speak to the code in a code review setting, to my peers, and to myself. Next project I will make sure that we are doing real TDD, even if it means not getting all of the features finished by the...

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